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Last Updated on:  12/16/2015 04:00 PM



 
Joy Blooms in the Garden

Joy Blooms  -- Compost It

Everything you ever wanted to know about composting:  Let's get Started   
Basic How-To    Tip & Tricks
    FAQ     Build a Bin     What's In?     Brown & Green    
Now What?     What's went Wrong    Unusual Compost Items      Say It Ain't So     
Composting Learning Resources & Supplies


Last Edited on:  12/16/2015 08:07 AM


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Composting Overview

Compost is the richest fertilizer you can use. And it is FREE, if you can make it yourself. You don't need to buy commercial fertilizers when you use this "natural one."   Compost results for decaying organic material like leaves, grass, or kitchen scraps.  Although compost can be made in an open pile, you'll get faster results if you use a bin.  Nature does the work for you.  All you have to do is provide the right environment of heat, moisture, air, and materials for the organisms in the compost pile.

If you live in an area which has cold winters, the spring is the best time to start the compost pile. If not, you can work your compost any time when there is a supply of grass clippings and other organic material.  In all climates, summer is the perfect time for composting.  Most gardeners find that they can make several batches during the summer.

Compost is not soil, but when mixed in your planting areas, it improves your soil.  You will see changes in texture & fertility.  Compost will loosen clay soils and it will help sandy soils retain water.  The organic matter provided in compost provides food for many different organisms, including fungi, bacteria, insects and worms.  This decay of organic material keeps the soil in a healthy well-balanced condition with the nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus which is produced naturally.

Almost any organic material can be used in the compost pile.  Two types of organic material is needed:  carbon-rich materials "browns," and nitrogen-rich materials "greens." Include brown materials like dried leaves, straw, saw dust and wood chips. Include fresh or green materials such as grass clippings and kitchen scraps.  Quick list of what goes in and what stays outList of Brown & Green Materials.    Composting Learning Resources & Supplies

There is no single "right" compost technique. There are several variations based upon some basic principles of aerobic decomposition. The technique you start with may be modified as you gain experience. Keep it simple, convenient, and suited to your lifestyle.

Do not use ashes from the barbeque, animal by-products (meat scraps, grease, bones), milk or dairy products, dog or cat droppings, cardboard or diseased plants.  Certainly don't add yard wastes that be treated with chemicals.  When in doubt DO NOT ADD IT.

When the compost is "done" mix it liberally into new planting areas and also around existing plants.  Most successful gardeners perform this task once or twice a year.  Treat composting as an art and not a pure science.  All organic matter breaks down eventually, no matter what you do.  A bit more brown is a good rule. You will find that you learn by doing.   With time you will discover what works best for you.

Basic Instructions -- to make compost


Joy Blooms . . . Compost It!

Everything you ever wanted to know about composting:  Let's get Started   
Basic How-To    Tip & Tricks
    FAQ     Build a Bin     What's In?     Brown & Green    
Now What?     What's went Wrong    Unusual Compost Items      Say It Ain't So     


Further Composting Information Internet Links:

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